Ingredient Origins
Burdock Root
Burdock Root
Burdock is actually the common name of a genus of flowering perennials, whose scientific name is Arctium. The easiest way to describe burdock is as the small burrs that often get stuck on your trousers or socks when walking in a forest. Those small hooking burrs come from the burdock plant

Burdock is native to Europe and Northern Asia, and is now widespread throughout the United States, where it grows as a weed. In Japan and parts of Europe, it is cultivated as a vegetable. Some reported benefits of Burdock include its ability to aid digestion, aide the liver, improve skin health, reduce inflammation, and lower blood pressure.

The first real use of burdock is recorded in the medieval period, but it is also known in Chinese herbal medicine.

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Chicory Root
Chicory Root
Chicory (Cichorium intybus L. Plant Family: Asteraceae) is a larger relative of the dandelion. Its large taproot has been used as a coffee substitute for generations. Chicory's leaves are used in salads and spring tonics in the same way as dandelion greens. It has been cultivated along the Nile in Egypt for thousands of years. Charlemagne listed it as one of the herbs he required be grown in his garden. It was brought to North America from Europe in the 18th century and is now established in the US.

Organic chicory root contains inulin, a soluble fiber that feeds digestive flora in the intestines. Many plants contain inulin, but chicory root has the highest concentration.

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Dandelion
Dandelion
While many people think of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) as a pesky weed, it is chock full of vitamins A, B, C, and D, as well as minerals, such as iron, potassium, and zinc. Hundreds of species of dandelion grow in the temperate regions of Europe, Asia, and North America. Dandelion flowers open with the sun in the morning and close in the evening or during gloomy weather.

In folk medicine, dandelion roots and leaves were used to treat liver problems. Native Americans also boiled dandelion in water and took it to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn, and upset stomach. So far, there have not been any quality scientific studies on dandelion. Today, the roots are mainly used to stimulate the appetite, and for liver and gallbladder problems.

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Holy Basil
Holy Basil
Holy Basil (also known as Tulsi, or Ocimum sanctum) has been revered for its medicinal value throughout India for thousands of years. Ayurvedic texts describe Holy Basil as a pillar of holistic herbal medicine and a goddess incarnated in plant form (the mother medicine of nature). The folklore around Holy basil says people have used it for the common cold, influenza ("the flu"), diabetes, asthma, bronchitis, earache, headache, stomach upset - the list goes on and on.

Early research found that taking 500 mg of holy basil leaf extract twice daily after meals for 60 days reduced anxiety and associated stress and depression in people with anxiety. Researchers are actively studying this plant to see where its historical healing properties intersect with scientific data.

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Nettle
Nettle
Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica and the closely related Urtica urens) has a long medicinal history. In medieval Europe, it was used as a diuretic (to rid the body of excess water) and to treat joint pain. Stinging nettle has been used for hundreds of years to treat painful muscles and joints, eczema, arthritis, gout, and anemia. Stinging nettle is the name given to common nettle, garden nettle, and hybrids of these plants. Originally from the colder regions of northern Europe and Asia, this herbaceous shrub grows all over the world today.

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Rhodiola
Rhodiola
Rhodiola has a legendary history dating back thousands of years. In 77 A.D., the Greek physician Dioscorides documented the medical applications of the plant, which he then called rodia riza, in his classic medical text De Materia Medica. The Vikings depended on the herb to enhance their physical strength and endurance.

Rhodiola Rosea has long been known as a potent adaptogen. Adaptogens are natural plant substances that increase the body's nonspecific resistance and normalize the functions of the body.It is thought to strengthen the nervous system, fight depression, enhance immunity, elevate the capacity for exercise, enhance memory, aid weight reduction, increase sexual function and improve energy levels

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.
Maple Syrup
Maple Syrup
Maple syrup is the only product in our diet coming directly from a plant’s sap. It contains over 63 antioxidants that can help delay or prevent diseases caused by free radicals, such as cancer or diabetes. In addition, maple syrup features high levels of zinc and manganese, keeping the heart healthy and boosting the immune system.

Early settlers in the U.S. Northeast and Canada learned about sugar maples from Native Americans. Various legends exist to explain the initial discovery. One is that the chief of a tribe threw an ax or chopping blade at a tree, sap ran out and his wife boiled venison in the liquid. Canada produces 71% of the world’s pure maple syrup with the U.S. being it's primary importer.

* Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.

INGREDIENTS

Organic Raw Kombucha (Organic Black
Tea, Organic Cane Sugar & Organic Kombucha Culture), Organic Roasted Roots Tea (Dandelion, Burdock, Chicory), Organic Apple Juice, Organic Roasted Barley*, Organic Malt Extract*, Organic Herbal Tea (Holy Basil, Stinging Nettle, Rhodiola Rosea), Organic Spices, Organic Maple Syrup, Organic Molasses, and Organic Natural Flavors.
*Contains a trace amount of Barley gluten.

CERTIFICATIONS

Nutrition Facts

CAFFEINE

Caffeine Chart